Page 1 sur 2 12 DernièreDernière
Affiche les résultats de 1 à 10 sur 12

Sujet : Un point sur les universités Japonaises (classement)

  1. #1
    Senior Member Avatar de zev
    Inscrit
    mars 2005
    Messages
    2 101
    Merci
    17
    Remercié 100 Fois dans 72 Messages

    Par défaut Un point sur les universités Japonaises (classement)

    Un point sur le classement des universités Japonaises dans le monde.
    Tokyo toujours la mieux classée des universités Japonaises.
    Keio est la mieux classée parmis les universités privées

    Voila, je délivre les informations brutes sans autre commentaire




    The 2006 World University Rankings, published on the 5th of October 2006 in The Times Higher Education Supplement (http://www.thes.co.uk/)

    11 Japanese universities entered the Top 200 universities

    *The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) is a British weekly newspaper by the Times which specializes on higher education.

    Japanese Universities Ranking

    Tokyo University 19  (16)
    Kyoto University 29 (31)
    Osaka University 70 (105)
    Tokyo Institute of Technology 118 (99)
    Keio University 120 (215)
    Kyushu University 128 (222)
    Nagoya University 128 (129)
    Hokkaido University 133 (157)
    Waseda University 158 (202)
    Tohoku University 168 (136)
    Kobe University 181 (172)   

    ( )2005 ranking

    <Reference>
    Top 10 Universities

    1 Harvard University
    2 Cambridge University
    3 Oxford University
    4 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    4 Yale University
    6 Stanford University
    7 California Institute of Technology
    8 University of California, Berkeley
    9 Imperial College London
    10 Princeton University


    › Lire Plus: Un point sur les universités Japonaises (classement)
    La campagne ca vous gagne!
    http://goo.gl/dZ5uWR

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Inscrit
    août 2003
    Lieu
    Toulouse
    Messages
    321
    Merci
    0
    Remercié 0 Fois dans 0 Messages

    Par défaut

    Les classements de ce type me laissent toujours sceptique. Les chinois ont réalisé le même type de classement en ce basant sur le nbre de prix Nobel et nbre de publications des enseignants et thésards de l'université.

    Est-ce une moyenne toute discipline confondues ? est-ce que cela dépend de la taille de l'université ? Typiquement, les écoles les plus côtés en France apparaissent toujours très mal placée car elles sont spécialisées et toujours petites.

    Il y a qq temps qq s'interrogeait sur la meilleur université dans le domaine du commerce et il hésitait. La "meilleure" était Hitotsubashi.
    http://www.lejapon.org/forum/threads...yo-Kyoto-Osaka

    Tout ça pour dire que:
    1) Il serait bon que tu rappelles les critères utilisés pour établir le classement.
    2) selon les disciplines, le classement peut varier du tout au tout. Y-a-t-il un classement pas discipline ?
    Dernière modification de JM, 10/08/2013 à 08h59

  3. #3
    Senior Member Avatar de zev
    Inscrit
    mars 2005
    Messages
    2 101
    Merci
    17
    Remercié 100 Fois dans 72 Messages

    Par défaut

    1) Il serait bon que tu rappelles les critères utilisés pour établir le classement.
    2) selon les disciplines, le classement peut varier du tout au tout. Y-a-t-il un classement pas discipline ?

    >>

    Je ne suis pas abonné au THES donc je ne peux pas avoir acces a ces données

    néanmoins voila le classement de 2005
    http://www.alnaja7.org/success/Educa...nking_2005.pdf
    la methodologie doit y etre indiquée (j'ai pas tout lu)

    A la fin il y a d'autres classement (par continent et par discipline)

  4. #4
    Senior Member Avatar de zev
    Inscrit
    mars 2005
    Messages
    2 101
    Merci
    17
    Remercié 100 Fois dans 72 Messages

    Par défaut

    tiré de http://www.thes.co.uk/worldrankings/...ory_id=2032986

    Insiders and outsiders lend a balanced view

    Martin Ince
    Published: 06 October 2006


    Peer review is once again a key criterion in this year’s rankings. But research quality is now gauged on five rather than ten years of citations, making it more topical, says Martin Ince

    The tables on pages 3-5 are the third edition of The Times Higher/QS World University Rankings. As in 2004 and 2005, they list the world’s top 200 universities according to a range of qualitative and quantitative criteria. Our methodology this year follows that we used in 2005 very closely.

    Qualitative and quantitative forms of data each account for half the total score. The qualitative data is based on our belief that the people who know most about university quality are those who work in them or are closely connected to them.

    For this reason, 40 per cent of the score allotted to each university is derived from peer review carried out among academics by QS Ltd, partners with The Times Higher in compiling the World University Rankings. This has involved gathering data from 3,703 academics around the world. Each was asked which area of academic life — science, medicine, technology, the social sciences or the arts and humanities — they are expert in, and then asked to name up to 30 universities they regard as the top institutions in their area. This is a robust and simple test, and is almost immune to fraud. To achieve this large total of participants, we amalgamated data from our surveys in 2004 and 2005 with this year’s responses. However, only the most recent response was used from any individual. In future years, we shall not use data more than three years old.

    This peer review shows that, although there are a few dozen universities that are plainly world leaders, there are also well-regarded universities in a surprisingly large variety of countries, in both the rich and developing worlds. Indeed, Top Universities Guide, the book that accompanies this supplement, shows that the top 500 universities in the world all have their supporters. The top 200 come from 30 countries, while the top 500 come from 51.

    This peer review is enhanced by a further 10 per cent of the score based on the opinion of a vital group of outsiders who observe the world’s universities closely. These are graduate recruiters, especially those who work internationally or on a substantial national scale. The sample includes people from companies in manufacturing, services, finance and transport, as well as from the public sector. They were asked which universities they like to recruit from, a question that we hope reveals something about the quality of the students an institution can attract and the teaching they receive there. We sampled 736 recruiters.

    Peer review is the standard way in which the quality of individual pieces of academic work is judged. We believe that applying it to institutions in the controlled way we have done provides an up-to-date measure of the dynamism of whole institutions and of wide groups of subjects in them.

    The other half of the rankings scores are made up of quantitative measures. As with the whole of this exercise, the problem is to obtain a measure of university quality that can be calculated on a consistent basis in widely differing environments. This means developing questions that can be answered in a valid and informative way in Norway as well as in Brazil.

    Teaching and research are the main activities that occur in universities. Measures designed to capture the quality of these activities account for 40 per cent of the total score in our rankings.

    We measure teaching by the classic criterion of staff-to-student ratio. This is captured by asking universities how many staff and students they have, and dividing one by the other. In practice, things are not quite so simple. One complication is to decide exactly who is a student. We ask universities to count people studying towards degrees or other substantial qualifications, not those taking short courses. Staff numbers, too, can be a matter of opinion. We ask universities to submit a figure based on staff with some regular contractual relationship with the institution. A guest lecturer, however distinguished, should not count. This measure is also prone to subject bias. Teaching people to be surgeons or musicians is inherently more person-intensive than transmitting some other forms of knowledge. But because our analysis deals mainly with large general universities, this variation should even itself out.

    The measure of staff-to-student ratio is intended to determine how much attention a student can hope to get at a specific institution, by seeing how well stocked it is with academic brainpower relative to the size of its student body. It accounts for 20 per cent of the possible score.

    Our next measure, relating to research, is intended to examine how much intellectual power a university has relative to its size. It is based on citations of academic papers, since these are regarded as the most reliable measure of a paper’s impact. The world’s accepted authority on citations is Thomson Scientific in Philadelphia, formerly the Institute of Scientific Information. We use data from Thomson’s Essential Science Indicators database, processed by Evidence Ltd in Leeds. The ESI concentrates on the world’s most highly cited and influential research. Our analysis uses data covering 2001-06. This is a change from the first two editions of the World University Rankings, which used ten years of data. Using five years increases the dynamism and rate of change of this measure, but still provides a statistically valid amount — more than 40,000 papers and more than a million citations each for Texas and Harvard universities, the world’s top two generators of scholarship on this measure.

    To compile our analysis, we divide the number of citations by staff numbers to correct for institution size and to give a measure of how densely packed each university is with the most highly cited and impactful researchers.

    There are well-known problems with citations as a measure of research. One is the underrepresentation of papers in languages other than English in citations data. Thomson is addressing this issue by sampling more journals in Asian and continental European languages. But it is also becoming less of a factor as English becomes the language of choice for academic publishing across the world.

    As our introduction on page 2 makes clear, the increasingly international nature of higher education is a key reason for the existence of the World University Rankings. The final 10 per cent of our score is intended to determine how global universities are:

    5 per cent is awarded on the basis of the percentage of overseas staff each university has, and a further 5 per cent for its percentage of overseas students. This measure is intended to help mobile staff and students by giving them an impression of how international a university may be. But because this measure counts for only 10 per cent of the total score, it is not possible for an institution to do well in the overall table on this measure without being excellent in other categories.

    There are many measures we do not attempt to capture in these pages. We gather data on universities that teach undergraduates only. This eliminates many high-quality specialist institutions such as Rockefeller University and the University of California, San Francisco, both of which are postgraduate medical institutions.

    We have considered a wide range of other criteria, such as graduate employment and entry standards, as possible quality measures. But these have all failed the test of being applicable evenly around the world. For example, a university in a particular country could show poor graduate employment figures because of the state of its national economy, not because it provided a bad education.

    Likewise, universities are under pressure to produce spin-off companies and other forms of knowledge transfer. But their success in doing so will depend to a large extent on the economic system in which they are embedded. In the same way, it is impossible to devise a universal measure for entry standards. However, we are always interested in readers’ suggestions for new measures we could consider applying.

    We regret that there are no data on Royal Holloway, University of London. We plan to include the institution in the rankings for 2007.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Avatar de ptitjoji
    Inscrit
    juillet 2004
    Lieu
    Paris > Edinburgh > Strasbourg > Aix > [Yokohama] > ...
    Messages
    1 295
    Merci
    2
    Remercié 0 Fois dans 0 Messages

    Par défaut

    C'est vrai que ça dépend des critères. Un Japonais que j'ai rencontré en Mars m'avait sorti un classement mettant Kyôdai devant Tôdai, au regard notamment des prix Nobel. Bof bof, en même temps si un jour je me retrouve dans l'une je me plaindrai pas de pas être dans l'autre...
    働き過ぎにはご注意下さい

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Inscrit
    décembre 2003
    Lieu
    paris
    Messages
    232
    Merci
    0
    Remercié 0 Fois dans 0 Messages

    Par défaut

    Juste une tite parenthèse mon école a un partenaria avec l'université de Sophia ou se situe t'elle?

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Inscrit
    mars 2005
    Lieu
    déménagé de paris
    Messages
    758
    Merci
    0
    Remercié 0 Fois dans 0 Messages

    Par défaut

    euh… désolé de le dire, Sophia mmmm, comment dire… pas mal mais pas plus quoi… Les étudaints, ils sont assez tranquilles, les profs, pas trop ambitieux scientifiquement mais bon, la fac, elle est bien placée et pratique, puisque Yotsuya, les filles sont zoli zoli…

    Pour revenir au sujet, la réelle qualité des universités varie selon le département, d'une part et, de l'autre, le critère de jugement. Si on privilégiait créativité et originalité, Kyooto serait la meilleure que Tokyo (quoi que, la fac de Tokyo a changé ces dernières années). Certains placent Keioo au rang top, mais d'après mon ex (qui sort de Keioo), les gens du département d'éco et commerce sont nullissimes (moi, je dirais pareil pour Waseda, mais son département d'architecture est pas mal du tout).

    Je suis un peu étonné par le mauvais classement de Toohoku, d'où le plus jeune nobel de chimie est sorti (de même, il y a un archi-connu à la fac de technologie). Mon étonnement va aussi à Kyuushuu. Ça doit être grâce à des publications de Saitan.

    Comme on le voit, la qualité dépend de la discipline.

    keya, mal classé avec l'éducation nationale de France
    En m'avançant dans le sentier de montagne, je me dis ainsi…

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Inscrit
    août 2003
    Lieu
    Toulouse
    Messages
    321
    Merci
    0
    Remercié 0 Fois dans 0 Messages

    Par défaut

    Les critères favorisent déliberément les modèles de grande université généraliste couvrant un maximum de domaine et produisant des publications en anglais.

    40% de la note vient de la citation de l'université par des personnes reconnues. Mais aucune distinction n'est faite par spécialité. De facto cela élimine les petites universités ou école à la francaise.

    Les publications en langue non-anglaises sont prises en partie en compte mais pas à la même valeur.

    Si l'on peut considérer que l'anglais est la langue des publications de grande valeur (genre pub dans la revue Nature), une université anglo-saxone va toujours publier en anglais (qqsoit le niveau de la publi), une université non anglophone va privilégier sa langue pour les publi classiques et l'anglais pour les publi importantes. Selon quel critère une publi lambda en anglais aurait plus de valeur qu'un publi lambda en grec, japonais ou serbo-croate ?

    Bref, tout ça pour dire que ce genre de classement est très subjectif voire orienté. A chacun de se faire son opinion.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Avatar de zev
    Inscrit
    mars 2005
    Messages
    2 101
    Merci
    17
    Remercié 100 Fois dans 72 Messages

    Par défaut

    il y a des classement par specialité dans le rapport de 2005.

    On fait dire ce qu'on veut a un classement comme ca, mais le fait est que ce sont les recruteurs qui lisent ce classement. Et que donc on ne peut pas l'ignorer.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Inscrit
    août 2003
    Lieu
    Toulouse
    Messages
    321
    Merci
    0
    Remercié 0 Fois dans 0 Messages

    Par défaut

    La où je te rejoins, c'est que les universités françaises et le gouvernement devraient en prendre de la graine. Ces classements donnent une image très bonne de certains pays et moins bonne d'autres dont la France. Le marketing fonctionne à merveille.

    Qui n'a jamais entendu parler d'Oxford, Cambridge, du MIT ou de Harvard ? En revanche qui connait l'X ou HEC en dehors de l'hexagone et de qqs gens particulièrement au fait de la spécificité francaise ?
    Pourtant un étudiant de l'X doit bien valoir un de Harvard.

    Le jour où l'état aura compris cela, le France ne sera peut-être plus limitée à la Sorbone.

sujet d'information

Utilisateur(s) parcourant ce sujet

il y a actuellement 1 utilisateur(s) parcourant ce sujet. (0 membres et 1 visiteurs)

Sujets similaires

  1. Fac Question sur la réputation de certaines universités japonaises
    Par Spelmo dans le forum Facs, cours, tests, examens
    Réponses: 10
    Dernier message: 21/07/2011, 16h30
  2. Divers Classement des universités japonaises
    Par fujijana dans le forum Japon - Questions générales
    Réponses: 7
    Dernier message: 20/01/2010, 08h37
  3. Fac Ecoles de commerce et universités japonaises
    Par Jbl dans le forum Facs, cours, tests, examens
    Réponses: 8
    Dernier message: 20/07/2007, 02h29
  4. Divers Universitaires français et universités japonaises
    Par Deeedo dans le forum Travailler au Japon
    Réponses: 7
    Dernier message: 20/05/2007, 06h28
  5. Divers universités japonaises
    Par lovelyh dans le forum Japon - Questions générales
    Réponses: 13
    Dernier message: 26/06/2005, 10h39

Règles des messages

  • Vous ne pouvez pas créer de sujets
  • Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets
  • Vous ne pouvez pas importer de fichiers joints
  • Vous ne pouvez pas modifier vos messages
  •  
  • Les BB codes sont Activés
  • Les Smileys sont Activés
  • Le BB code [IMG] est Activé
  • Le code [VIDEO] est Activé
  • Le code HTML est Désactivé